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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
FOX News
Dec 5, 2013 3:00am PST
is something like this. >> stuff that's worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. >> okay. is that a fair comparison? we're going to report and you're going to decide. how does the "duck dynasty" family celebrate christmas? the ladies, miss kay, cory, missy and jessica join us live next from west monroe, louisiana. ♪ ♪ before using her new bank of america credit card, which rewards her for responsibly managing her card balance. before receiving $25 toward her balance each quarter for making more than ht on time each month. tracey got the bankamericard better balance rewards credit card, which fits nicely with everything else in life she has to balance. that's the benefit of responsibility. apply online or visit a bank of america near you. at any minute... could be a victim of fraud. most people don't even know it. fraud could mean lower credit scores, higher loan rates... ...and maybe not getting the car you want. it's a problem waiting to hapn. check your credit score, check your credit repo, at america's numb one provider of online credit rorts an
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am PST
of the apartheid foe and civil rights icon, nelson mandela. we continue that, just ahead. ♪ we know we're not the center of your life, but we'll do our best to help you connect to what is. ♪ [ male announcer ] laura's heart attack didn't come with a warning. today her doctor has her on a bayer aspirin regimen to help reduce the risk of another one. if you've had a heart attack, be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. you know that, right? uh-huh. i know this hasn't always been easy for you. and i'm really happy that you're in my life too. ♪ it's just like yours, mom! [ jane ] behind every open heart is a story. tell yours with my open hearts collection at kay jewelers, the number one jewelry store in america. there are millions of reasons to give one, but the message is always the same. keep your heart open... and love will always find its way in. thank you. thank you. ♪ every kiss begins with kay thank you. ♪ feed them natural and healthy blue™ buffalo, like family, featuring lifesource® bits that are now enhanced with our super 7 package of natu
Dec 5, 2013 3:00pm PST
as director of the southern africa project of the lawyers committee for civil rights under law. douglas foster is the author of "after mandela: the struggle for freedom in post-apartheid south africa." he's an associate professor at northwestern university's medill school of journalism. donald gibb and john stremlau is vice president for peace programs at the carter center. he taught at the university of the witwatersrand in johannesburg. >> welcome to you mcdour first reaction tonight on hearing of the loss of nelson mandela? >> well, i'm terribly sad.of co. we knew it was coming. but nevertheless, it is a shock. and it's quite sad thing. i think first of all, the people of south africa who would be mourning in a very special way, but i think all around the world has lost a hero, a hero that we desperately needed, when he came forward and faif us hope. >> -- gave us hope. >> as we continue thisconversat. we do want to say to local stations that we are not going to be taking a break tonight so we can continue to discuss nelson mandela's life and legacy. and i want to pick up with you p
Dec 6, 2013 2:30am PST
at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. >> so help me god. >> reporter: as promised, he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> south africa has been a despotic state through almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela's legacy stands against it. that is one of the best and most optimistic qualities that he hands to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts, the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man whos has done his duty on earth. >> keith miller reporting. joining us the council on foreign relations richard haas. we talk a lot in vague terms how iconic and important he was. can you somehow crystallize it from a global perspective, his impact? >> just imagine if nelson mandela had been a different kind of person and south africa had gone into a bloody race war in which apartheid didn't end peacefully, but instead, had been a violent transition in which hundreds of thousands of people had died simply because of race. imagine what that
Dec 7, 2013 4:00am PST
that there is true freedom in forgiveness. >>> joining me now, civil rights leader and president of the rainbow push coalition, reverend jesse jackson. awfully glad to speak with you. you listened to president clinton. do you agree he belongs in the statues of history with gandhi, martin luther king jr. if not maybe at the top of the list? >> external persecution and the wil will, dignity. they were driven by their suffering. you define them by what they did with the pain. that is to say when mr. mandela chose to use his pain for transformation. to use his pain for reconciliation, revenge or retaliation it took him to different level. >> what was it like to be in the same room as he was. oftentimes there are leaders -- and i will say this is applied to you as well. there are some people you think they take up all the energy because there's something about them. he must have had that as well. >> well, he did have a personal magnetism. i remember the first sunday he came out of jail in cape town at south africa at city hall. he walked in the room. having been in jail for 27 years, so aware and so aler
Dec 8, 2013 9:00am PST
. stateside, a yuounger generatio of american civil rights leaders is reflecting on the legacy of the man and how he inspired them. one of them downing me now from washington, d.c. former president and ceo of the naacp, ben jellis. i'd like to know when nelson mandela first got on your radar. what was the first context in which you learned about him and when you first saw him in person. >> you know, the first conversation was with my mom explaining to me why we couldn't drink coke and we couldn't get gas from the shell station and really talking about how similar the struggle that was happening then in south africa was to what she had gone through as a young person in this country. the first time i saw him was he was doing a tour when he got out of prison. it was 1989. he came to the coliseum in the east bay. i and tens of thousands of people were all gathered there. i recall pushing my way up to the front. you know, for us, we were used to having black leaders assassinated in their prime and spending the rest of our lives wondering what could have been, what would have been. and with him
Dec 8, 2013 6:00am PST
. for our president to be so moved by mandela, to really have his own place in a civil rights struggle against apartheid. >> when it comes to president obama's presence on the international stage this potential for comprehensive agreement with iran yesterday. it could be worse. when it comes to the international stage how is his capital? >> i don't think it is exceedingly high. i think a lot of american allies think america has lost its nerve in some regard particularly when it comes to confronting iran. i think there is difficulty with our credibility because our economic standing has impact as well. it doesn't diminish america's power and influence in the world. >> how much focus for president obama in terms of international? it isn't just iran? >> it is looking so difficult. as you look towards next year disengaging from afghanistan becomes the story. iran becomes the big test. no one knows whether iran will do what president obama wants it to do which is basically dismantle any pretense. >> nice to have you here. we'll see you a little bit laterer. a little bit later. >>> we vel a
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am PST
life. >> reporter: president obama paid homage to a civil rights icon. >> let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the mark of the moral universe toward justice. >> reporter: queen elizabeth remembered his efforts. his legacy is the peaceful south africa we see today, she said. a glittering film premiere in london attended by the royal couple and two of mandela's daughters celebrated the movie of his life, "long walk to freedom." his death was announced as the credits rolled. >> extremely tragic news. we are just reminded what an extraordinary man he was. >> reporter: mandela will have a state funeral but it was his leading by example that helped so many. >> we lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings any of us will share time with here on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> reporter: this country is now in an official state of mourning. his body will lie in state for viewing and a funeral is expected. matt, back to you. >> richard, thanks so muc
Dec 6, 2013 1:40am PST
and the british refer to as "the riot on king street"? >> all right, i know fort sumter was the civil war, and the alamo was somewhere down in texas, and texas wasn't around during the revolutionary war, i don't think, so the burning of washington and the boston massacre. name that shifts the blame. all right, i'm gonna go with... jumping the question 'cause i'm not sure. >> it's my boo. >> [laughter] >> you gonna hit me with my whole move. i was all like, "what are you gonna do? oh, you gonna jump the question." so you jumped over. not really sure, decided to jump over it. >> not really sure, yeah. >> all right, it is now out of play. you thinkin' it was possibly "b," 'cause that's the one you would have, if you would have guessed. >> yes, if i would have guessed. >> what is the correct answer? it is indeed "b," the boston massacre. again, it's double money week. hopefully this money is small. what'd she jump over? oh, well, jumped over $1,000. that's all right. when we come back, clarice is going for her double money question. millionaire in just a second. it's so much more than coffee.
Al Jazeera America
Dec 9, 2013 6:00am EST
people wanted justice, and especially coming out at the end of the civil rights movement, a lot of people in the united states were thinking where do i put my energy now. the idea and the images that were coming out of south africa with rewards to the apartheid movement really ignited their imagination and the passion for justice. >> can't wait to see the film. >> thank you. >> thank you for being with us. the film is the 12 disciples of nelson mandela. it is about the people who were behind the scenes of the movement. here's what we can expect next in south africa. nelson mandela will be laid to rest during the official state funeral taking place in a 10 day period. tomorrow begins the memorial service, open to the public. the government are he can specking 80,000 people to be in attendance there. from wednesday to friday, international visitors will view mandelle la's remains. his body will be taken to the eastern cape where the ruling party will then pay their final respects. sunday, december 15 will bring the 10 day funeral to an end. dignitaries scheduled to attend, 71 expected to be
Dec 2, 2013 8:00am EST
and changes to underperforming k-12 schools. governor malloy has called education the civil rights issue of our time, and he'll talk about his agenda at a forum of the american enterprise institute beginning at 1:30 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies this 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: and best selling author tom standage has a new book out, and it's called "writing on the wall." tom standage, what do cicero and twitter have in common? >> guest: well, the idea of the book is that social media is a very old idea. we think that it's recent and only people alive today have ever done it. but really what i'm arguing is there's a very long and rich tradition of social media that goes back to the era of cicero, so that's the first century b.c., and the point is that you don't need a digital network to do social media. if you have one, it goes faster, but you could actually do it in the old days. cicero did it with papyrus rolls and ore members -- other members of the roman elites were linked to him and al
Dec 7, 2013 1:30pm EST
as lawyer, i've had to persuade civil rights groups to take particular positions when, for example, in new york city once an organization wanted to stop george lincoln rockwell, a terrible racist, from speaking in a park there, and i had a very difficult time persuading them that that's probably the -- trying to keep him from being licensed to speak is probably the best way to give him a big audience. why not just ignore him? and the same thing with books. you know, sometimes i know authors can't get any better advertisement than somebody trying to keep their books off the shelves. but when it does happen -- and it does happen frequently -- we're really talking about one of the most dangerous robs in our culture -- problems in our culture, and it is the stifling of ideas and taken to the extreme in nazi germany when they burn books, we see where that goes. so my excerpt isn't as delightful as the last one. it concerns the problems of war, and it comes from a book almost 100 years old about war, "all quiet on the western front." before going over to see -- [inaudible] we pack up his things.
Dec 7, 2013 5:00am PST
. >> reporter: i want to get your thoughts as someone who has walked among civil rights giants and nelson mandela, and martin luther king. how aware were the two of them aware to their roles in the struggles? >> dr. king went to jail in '63 and so did nelson mandela. dr. king in his address referenced the struggle in south africa. the kinship from the american corporations and south africa and our government that was a part of it. also the things that we did here enabled mandela's freedom. for example, the '65 riots act that changed the course in this country. blacks could vote for the first time in the south and women could vote and you could vote on campuses and bilanguagebilangua. it clouded the sanctions on south africa led by congressman randell o. it seems to me our struggle and their struggle coincided very well. >> reporter: we appreciate your thoughts on this day, remembering nelson mandela. thank you. >> i'll see you before the week is over. >> reporter: all right. look forward to it. let's head back to new york now and erica. >> lester, thanks. >>> we want to turn to encour e
Al Jazeera America
Dec 2, 2013 5:00am EST
actually scrapped. this constitution is more emphasis that it's civil and more emphasis on people's freedoms and rights but many also feel that there is more power to the military which could mean less democracy. >> when the u.s. secretary of state john kerry was in cairo it was recognizing human rights more than democratic and what is the reaction to the way the constitution has now been shaped? >> we have already heard from americans regarding a new floor that was put in place and condemned it and said it had serious flaws and officials said the same thing and they call to the government to amendment. other provisions here that may find problematic. the u.s. is walking a delicate balance and doesn't want to interfere too much but also need to put enough pressure because many of the people expect them to do so when things are dipped to human rights violations and especially when it comes to the military getting more power. one thing we have to make clear is this referendum will be put to a vote and only if it's approved by the people the other steps and parliamentary elections an
Dec 8, 2013 7:00pm EST
-- >> and credit. >> right. >> looking at some of the figures who were known to people as established players, when the revolution finished as well as when the civil war was completed, george washington, for example, 1775, seemed to be somewhat of an out lie -- out-ly 'er. >> when i came up with the book, my concern was, washington, the walking marble man, and what us he going to really be a buzz kill once he arrives on the scene after the battle of bunker hill. anything but. i mean, it's just fascinating to see washington. a man from virginia, arriving in new england. a couple weeks after the battle of bunker hill -- and this is a new england army. these are people whose idea of diversity is, okay, i'm from massachusetts but i'm willing to serve in an army with someone from new hampshire. and then to have this plantation owner arrive, and he realizes, this is an army that, because they have grown up with the new england town meeting -- which is a wonderful form of government in which basically people argue until finally they come to a decision. the soldiers in this army, when given an order, would
Al Jazeera America
Dec 8, 2013 5:00am EST
of civil war in 2005. he denied there was any rift with his deputy. we have more from the sudanese capital. what has happened is a senior generalwho is a right hand man of the president has replaced him. it's important how the government sees it's need to maintain power it's a form of co-oco-opting him into power. it's kind of secured it in that sense. it's not clear how even if there are new faces in the government with the same old policies whether or not it will make a difference to being able to han handle the economic crisis this country faces. that is eric martin in car to k. >>> the u.s. says he is a war veteran. glorchlts th-9dthe saga for for. >> when merl newman made the trip to south korea he wouldn't know how difficult it b it wouln out. he is now back in the u.s. beside his wife with a message. >> it was a great homecoming and i'm tired and i'm with my family now. thank you all for the support we got and very much appreciate it. >> newman was a soldier in the korean war and his visit was a long planned vacation down memory lane. he was no orland ordinary soldi. the south korea
Dec 8, 2013 12:15am EST
joe has really led to the most exciting three hours that you can find on television every day in civil discourse and a place where people can really get a lot of different points of view. let's figure out the room. first of all how many republicans here today, looking for the right path? >> we have got a few. >> how many democrats? c. yeah. >> it's "msnbc." >> how many independents max? this is our show. this is morning joe lies. >> it really is. it's all about friday, friday of independence and it starts with an mika and myself. as you know i'm a conservative from the deep south and mika is a liberal from the northeast. make a's dad is very excited rand u.s. foreign policy for years. [applause] you may be familiar with my dad's work to matt. he ran little league baseball. [applause] i was raised in the southern baptist church across the deep south and he of course was raised as a young marxist in the greater manhattan area. >> thank you very much. how many republicans voted for obama here? >> nobody's going to admit that. >> stand up. stand up. show yourself proudly. [applause] i didn
Dec 6, 2013 2:00pm EST
think mats comply civil underway, a to does not answer to work is going on right now. there's a question in the significant issues are in the midwest due to a variety of factors. in addition to rely on the midwest, the midcontinent iso in the states we need to stay closely involved. >> do you feel like epa is listening to you on these issues because i do because in 2011 when they put out their rule, they include a consultative role for ferc if someone needs a fifth year. i believe that includes not just a fifth year for retrofit but also -- and not just for retrofit but also as they need to figure to bring transmission and before the plan can retire. we voted out a policy statement of how we would handle those. we haven't gotten them yet because it's not far enough along in the process. >> they tell us they're listening to us a lot. sometimes we don't think they are. >> i am very grateful that it comes all the meetings and i'vee a commitment from them that they will continue. but it's something that needs close vigilance. >> i was going to ask you about your priorities. i felt like mr. w
Dec 2, 2013 12:00am EST
and in the case of boys, toxic in some ways. so i do believe that children need to be civilized, we have to open our hearts and minds and teach them to be caring and considerate human beings, but that does not mean that forcing boys to be exactly like girls is right, it doesn't mean being girls as if they are failing ophelia's at and for the most part, and this is a radical thing to say, most of them are quite healthy. and including most boys. we have to preserve a distinction, which is why sociologists have to do speed have a distinction between healthy masculinity. a young man that displays pathological masculinity, he shows his manhood by being destructive and tearing things apart, just basically -- a reign of terror. and the boy that has been healthy is the opposite. he is the opposite and he builds and he doesn't prey upon people he protects. and i still believe that that is the majority of men that i have known, and if i look at the data, the majority of men in the united states, they are -- they have been displaying healthy masculinity. the boys playing cops and robbers, it's terrible to
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)